TIME vs The Economist

G’day mate, how are things going? Today, I am going to touch on the difference between TIME and The Economist, considering their services and the level of the English language. If you usually buy a paper-based magazine, you probably don’t know the digital version’s services including free of charge services. So it might be interesting for some English learners. Let’s get underway.

TIME: this is a New York-based the first weekly magazine established in March 1923

  • TIME is written in standard American English, so if you are good at it, then it’s easy to follow all articles.
  • English language level: Please don’t get me wrong, but I’ve been reading this magazine since 2002, so I could probably be in a position to say something relating to what level of the English language TIME is situated. I feel like it should be between 5,000 – 10,000 words, which means that you have to have at least all basic grammar rules, Oxford 5000 words, basic etymology knowledge, correct pronunciation if you want to enjoy reading TIME without having a significant problem. (Exam equivalence: Eiken pre-1st to 1st grade; TOEIC800-900; IELTS6-7.0; TOEFL80-100; PTE50-65)
  • You can sign up free newsletters. There are a wide range of topics involved, so that you’ll never be bored stiff. You are going to receive newsletters daily, weekly, fortnightly and occasionally. https://cloud.newsletters.time.com/newsletters/?source=thank-you-doi
  • Unfortunately, there is non-free articles of paid digital version’s TIME for those having signed up newsletters. This a bit sucks, but it costs around 170 bucks, so if you are really eager to read TIME, please go ahead with the monthly subscription package. Otherwise, personally I reckon free newsletters is enough to be able to satiate with.

The Economist: This is a UK’s prestigious weekly magazine established in September 1843

  • The Economist is written in standard British English, so if you are good at it, then it’s easy to follow all articles.
  • English language level: Please don’t get me wrong, but I’ve been reading this magazine since 2002, so I could probably be in a position to say something relating to what level of the English language The Economist is situated. I feel like it should be between 7,000 – 15,000 words, which means that you have to have at least all basic grammar rules, Oxford 5000 words, basic etymology knowledge, correct pronunciation if you want to enjoy reading The Economist without having a significant problem. (Exam equivalence: Eiken 1st grade; TOEIC900-990; IELTS7.0-8.0; TOEFL100-120; PTE73-79)
  • You can sign up free newsletters. Unlike TIME, the Economist offers only basic daily newsletters, so you might feel not enough to be able to satisfy. However, as I said yesterday, there are much more free articles online, so not disappointing at all. You can enjoy podcasts, blogs, etc.
  • Once you’ve singed up, you can access up to five paid-version’s articles every month, which is quite an attractive option for avid English learners but don’t want to pay for subscription.
  • Last but not least, once you’ve signed up, you can participate in online debate, and make comments on articles, which is a very useful training for English learners to write your own opinions in English. You might receive their replies.

You don’t need to pay any money, but you still have enough opportunities to read so many free articles online. Why don’t we take full advantage of them?

That’s all for today. Thanks for reading!

Have a great day!

Published by Masato Kawaguchi

I am an English entrepreneur here in Australia. I am mainly teaching the PTE exam, general English as well as academic skills online. In addition to this, I'm offering visa follow-up support and assignment's proofreading service as well. Apart from these stuff, I am passionate about cycling both road and MTB. Nice to meet you guys!

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